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The Benefits of Using Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 for M/S Processing and Surround Sound



Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2: A Review




If you are looking for a powerful and flexible dynamic EQ plugin that can handle any audio processing task, you might want to check out Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2. This plugin is not only an EQ, not even just a dynamic EQ, but a true dynamics processor and EQ system at the same time. In this article, we will review what this plugin can do, how to use it, and some examples of it in action.




Brainworx bx dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2



What is Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2?




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 is a dynamic EQ plugin that allows you to adjust frequencies like an EQ and/or control dynamics like a compressor. It also adds M/S processing capabilities so you can separately adjust your Mid and Side signals. This plugin is a versatile tool for mixing, mastering, and sound design, as it can help you in many different situations, such as de-essing, dynamic EQing, bass-drum tuning, dynamic stereo-widening, M/S compression and limiting, and sound design.


Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 is a bundle of three plugins: mono, stereo (L/R), and M/S (M/S stereo). The mono and stereo plugins are suitable for regular L/R and mono signals, while the M/S plugin is designed for M/S stereo applications as well as surround signals. The M/S plugin introduces a unique "cross-feed" feature, which allows Mid & Side signals to actually trigger each other. This feature can create some interesting effects that are not possible with any other EQ.


What are the main features of Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2?




1-band and 2-band dynamic EQ modes




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 offers two modes of dynamic EQ: - 1-band mode: This mode allows you to use one dynamic EQ band with a variable filter type and frequency range. You can use this mode for simple tasks such as de-essing, removing resonances, or adding some dynamic movement to your sound. - 2-band mode: This mode allows you to use two dynamic EQ bands with independent filter types and frequency ranges. You can use this mode for more complex tasks such as dynamic EQing, bass-drum tuning, or M/S compression and limiting.


Many different types of Brainworx filters




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 offers a variety of filter types for each dynamic EQ band. You can choose from the following options: - Low Shelf: A shelf filter that boosts or cuts the low frequencies. - High Shelf: A shelf filter that boosts or cuts the high frequencies. - Peak: A bell-shaped filter that boosts or cuts a specific frequency range. - Low Cut: A high-pass filter that cuts the low frequencies below a certain point. - High Cut: A low-pass filter that cuts the high frequencies above a certain point. - Notch: A narrow band-reject filter that cuts a specific frequency range. - Band Pass: A narrow band-pass filter that passes a specific frequency range and cuts everything else.


Internal and external sidechain inputs




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 allows you to use either an internal or an external sidechain input for each dynamic EQ band. The sidechain input is the signal that triggers the dynamic EQ processing. You can use the internal sidechain input to make the dynamic EQ react to the same signal that is being processed, or you can use the external sidechain input to make the dynamic EQ react to a different signal that is fed into the plugin. For example, you can use an external sidechain input to make the dynamic EQ duck the bass when the kick drum hits, or to make the dynamic EQ de-ess the vocals when the sibilance occurs.


Inverse mode for creative effects




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 also features an inverse mode for each dynamic EQ band. The inverse mode reverses the direction of the gain reduction or boost, so that instead of cutting or boosting the frequencies when the sidechain signal exceeds the threshold, it does the opposite. This mode can create some creative effects, such as adding more sibilance to vocals, enhancing transients, or creating rhythmic patterns.


M/S cross-feed feature for triggering M and S signals




The M/S plugin of Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 introduces a unique feature called M/S cross-feed. This feature allows you to trigger the Mid and Side signals with each other, so that you can make the Mid signal affect the Side signal and vice versa. For example, you can use this feature to make the Side signal duck when the Mid signal is loud, or to make the Mid signal boost when the Side signal is quiet. This feature can create some interesting effects, such as dynamic stereo-widening, M/S compression and limiting, or M/S sound design.


How to use Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2?




Using Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 is easy and intuitive. Here are some steps to follow:


Select the plugin layout according to your signal type




The first thing you need to do is to select the plugin layout that matches your signal type. You can choose from mono, stereo (L/R), or M/S (M/S stereo) plugins. The mono plugin is suitable for mono signals, such as vocals, bass, or kick drum. The stereo plugin is suitable for stereo signals, such as guitars, keyboards, or overheads. The M/S plugin is suitable for M/S stereo signals, such as busses, groups, or final mixes. You can also use the M/S plugin for surround signals by routing them accordingly.


Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each band




The next thing you need to do is to adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each dynamic EQ band. These parameters control how much and how fast the dynamic EQ reacts to the sidechain signal. The threshold parameter sets the level at which the dynamic EQ starts to work. The ratio parameter sets the amount of gain reduction or boost applied to the signal. The attack parameter sets how fast the dynamic EQ responds to the sidechain signal. The release parameter sets how fast the dynamic EQ returns to its original state. You can adjust these parameters by dragging the nodes on the graphical display or by using the knobs below.


Choose the filter type and frequency range for each band




The next thing you need to do is to choose the filter type and frequency range for each dynamic EQ band. You can choose from low shelf, high shelf, peak, low cut, high cut, notch, or band pass filters. You can also adjust the Q factor, which controls the width and shape of the filter. You can choose the filter type and frequency range by clicking on the filter icons or by using the knobs below. You can also drag the nodes on the graphical display to change the frequency and gain of each band.


Enable or disable the inverse mode and the M/S cross-feed feature




The next thing you need to do is to enable or disable the inverse mode and the M/S cross-feed feature for each dynamic EQ band. The inverse mode reverses the direction of the gain reduction or boost, so that instead of cutting or boosting the frequencies when the sidechain signal exceeds the threshold, it does the opposite. The M/S cross-feed feature allows you to trigger the Mid and Side signals with each other, so that you can make the Mid signal affect the Side signal and vice versa. You can enable or disable these features by clicking on the buttons below each band.


Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band




The last thing you need to do is to fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band. The output gain controls the overall level of the processed signal. You can adjust it by using the knob at the bottom right corner of the plugin. You can also solo or bypass each band by clicking on the buttons below each band. This can help you to isolate and compare each band's effect on the signal.


What are some examples of Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 in action?




Now that you know how to use Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2, let's see some examples of what it can do in different situations.


De-essing vocals or instruments




One of the most common uses of dynamic EQ is de-essing, which is removing or reducing harsh sibilant sounds from vocals or instruments. To do this, you can use a 1-band dynamic EQ with a high-cut filter and an external sidechain input. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your vocal or instrument track. - Select a 1-band layout and a high-cut filter type. - Set an external sidechain input from your vocal or instrument track. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters so that the dynamic EQ only cuts the high frequencies when the sibilance occurs. - Choose a frequency range that covers the sibilant sounds, usually between 5 kHz and 10 kHz. - Adjust the Q factor to make the filter narrower or wider, depending on how much you want to cut. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass the band to hear the difference. Dynamic EQing of mono, stereo, or M/S signals




Another common use of dynamic EQ is dynamic EQing, which is adjusting the frequency balance of a signal according to its dynamics. To do this, you can use a 2-band dynamic EQ with peak filters and an internal sidechain input. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your mono, stereo, or M/S track. - Select a 2-band layout and peak filter types for both bands. - Set an internal sidechain input from your track. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each band so that the dynamic EQ boosts or cuts the frequencies when the signal is loud or quiet. - Choose a frequency range for each band that corresponds to the frequency areas you want to enhance or reduce, such as low-end, mid-range, or high-end. - Adjust the Q factor and the gain for each band to make the boost or cut more or less pronounced. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band to hear the difference. Bass-drum tuning in final mixes or drum groups




Another useful application of dynamic EQ is bass-drum tuning, which is changing the pitch of the bass drum in a final mix or a drum group. To do this, you can use a 1-band dynamic EQ with a low shelf filter and an external sidechain input. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your final mix or drum group track. - Select a 1-band layout and a low shelf filter type. - Set an external sidechain input from your bass drum track. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters so that the dynamic EQ only boosts or cuts the low frequencies when the bass drum hits. - Choose a frequency range that covers the fundamental frequency of the bass drum, usually between 40 Hz and 80 Hz. - Adjust the Q factor to make the filter steeper or smoother, depending on how much you want to change the pitch. - Adjust the gain to make the boost or cut higher or lower, depending on how much you want to tune up or down the bass drum. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass the band to hear the difference. Dynamic stereo-widening using the M/S features




Another interesting effect that you can achieve with dynamic EQ is dynamic stereo-widening, which is increasing or decreasing the stereo width of a signal according to its dynamics. To do this, you can use a 2-band dynamic EQ with high shelf filters and an internal sidechain input in M/S mode. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your stereo track. - Select a 2-band layout and high shelf filter types for both bands. - Set an internal sidechain input from your track. - Enable M/S mode by clicking on the M/S button at the top right corner of the plugin. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each band so that the dynamic EQ boosts or cuts the high frequencies of the Side signal when the signal is loud or quiet. - Choose a frequency range for each band that corresponds to the high-end of the Side signal, usually above 10 kHz. - Adjust the Q factor and the gain for each band to make the boost or cut more or less pronounced. - Enable the inverse mode for both bands by clicking on the INV buttons below each band. This will make the dynamic EQ cut the high frequencies of the Side signal when the signal is loud, and boost them when the signal is quiet. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band to hear the difference. M/S compression and limiting




Another useful technique that you can do with dynamic EQ is M/S compression and limiting, which is applying different levels of compression or limiting to the Mid and Side signals. To do this, you can use a 2-band dynamic EQ with low shelf filters and an internal sidechain input in M/S mode. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your stereo track. - Select a 2-band layout and low shelf filter types for both bands. - Set an internal sidechain input from your track. - Enable M/S mode by clicking on the M/S button at the top right corner of the plugin. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each band so that the dynamic EQ compresses or limits the low frequencies of the Mid and Side signals according to your preference. - Choose a frequency range for each band that covers the low-end of the Mid and Side signals, usually below 200 Hz. - Adjust the Q factor and the gain for each band to make the compression or limiting more or less pronounced. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band to hear the difference. Sound design with external sidechain and inverse mode




Another creative application of dynamic EQ is sound design, which is creating new sounds by manipulating existing sounds. To do this, you can use a 1-band or 2-band dynamic EQ with any filter type and an external sidechain input. You can also use the inverse mode to create some interesting effects. Here are some steps to follow:


- Insert Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 on your sound source track. - Select a 1-band or 2-band layout and any filter type for each band. - Set an external sidechain input from another sound source track, such as a drum loop, a synth pad, or a vocal sample. - Adjust the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters for each band so that the dynamic EQ modulates the frequency and gain of the sound source according to the sidechain signal. - Choose a frequency range and a Q factor for each band that suits your sound design goal, such as creating a rhythmic pattern, a filter sweep, or a pitch shift. - Enable or disable the inverse mode for each band by clicking on the INV buttons below each band. This will make the dynamic EQ do the opposite of what it normally does, such as boosting instead of cutting, or cutting instead of boosting. - Fine-tune the output gain and solo or bypass each band to hear the difference. Conclusion




Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 is a dynamic EQ plugin that can do much more than just EQing. It is a powerful and flexible tool that can handle any audio processing task, from mixing and mastering to sound design and creative effects. It offers many different types of filters, internal and external sidechain inputs, inverse mode, and M/S processing capabilities. It is easy and intuitive to use, and it can produce amazing results in any situation. If you are looking for a dynamic EQ plugin that can do it all, you should definitely give Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 a try.


FAQs




What is the difference between dynamic EQ and multiband compression?




Dynamic EQ and multiband compression are both types of dynamic processors that can adjust the frequency balance of a signal according to its dynamics. However, they have some differences in how they work and what they can do. Dynamic EQ uses filters to boost or cut specific frequency ranges when the signal exceeds or falls below a certain threshold. Multiband compression uses compressors to reduce the dynamic range of specific frequency ranges when the signal exceeds a certain threshold. Dynamic EQ can be more precise and transparent than multiband compression, as it can target narrower frequency bands and apply less gain reduction or boost. Multiband compression can be more aggressive and consistent than dynamic EQ, as it can control the overall loudness and balance of the signal.


What is M/S processing and why is it useful?




M/S processing is a technique that allows you to process the Mid and Side signals of a stereo signal separately. The Mid signal is the sum of the left and right channels, while the Side signal is the difference between the left and right channels. M/S processing can be useful for many reasons, such as enhancing or reducing the stereo width, adjusting the balance between the center and the sides, applying different effects to the Mid and Side signals, or encoding and decoding M/S stereo signals.


How can I use Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 with surround signals?




You can use Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 with surround signals by using the M/S plugin layout and routing your surround channels accordingly. For example, you can route your front left and right channels to the L/R inputs of the plugin, your center channel to the M input of the plugin, your rear left and right channels to the S input of the plugin, and your LFE channel to the output gain of the plugin. This way, you can use the M/S features of the plugin to process your surround signals in different ways.


How can I get Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2?




You can get Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2 from the official website of Brainworx. You can also get it from Plugin Alliance, which is a platform that offers a variety of plugins from different brands, including Brainworx. You can buy the plugin individually or as part of a bundle, such as the Brainworx Dynamic Bundle or the Plugin Alliance Mega Bundle. You can also try the plugin for free for 14 days by signing up for a Plugin Alliance account and downloading the trial version.


What are some alternatives to Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2?




If you are looking for some alternatives to Brainworx bx_dynEQ Native VST VST3 RTAS v2.0.2, you might want to check out some of these plugins: - FabFilter Pro-Q 3: A high-quality EQ plugin that also offers dynamic EQ, M/S processing, linear phase mode, and spectrum analyzer. - iZotope Neutron 3: A comprehensive mixing plugin that includes dynamic EQ, multiband compression, exciter, gate, limiter, and more. - Waves F6 Floating-Band Dynamic EQ: A dynamic EQ plugin that features six floating bands, internal and external sidechain inputs, and parallel mode. - Sonnox Oxford Dynamic EQ: A dynamic EQ plugin that features five bands, variable filter types, internal and external sidechain inputs, and adaptive mode. dcd2dc6462


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