top of page

Macanga Institute Group

Public·86 members

More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home: How to Design a Better, Not Bigger Home with Sarah Susanka



More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home Books Pdf File




Are you looking for some practical and creative ideas to improve your home? Do you want to make your home more comfortable, functional, and beautiful without spending a fortune or adding unnecessary square footage? If so, you might want to check out the book More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home by Sarah Susanka.




More Not So Big Solutions For Your Home Books Pdf File


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ftweeat.com%2F2ud78E&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1LFvmhk9SOSDv_9uKDY9TT



This book is a collection of articles by the best-selling author and visionary residential architect who sparked a movement toward better, not bigger homes. In this book, Susanka shares her insights on how to apply her philosophy of "Not So Big" design to various aspects of your home improvement projects. Whether you are planning to remodel, add on, or build from scratch, this book will help you create a home that suits your lifestyle, needs, and preferences.


In this article, we will give you an overview of some of the topics covered in this book. We will also provide you with some examples and tips on how to implement these ideas in your own home. By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of how to make your home more livable, enjoyable, and sustainable with the "Not So Big" design approach.


How to use color and unify an interior with trim




One of the easiest and most effective ways to improve the look and feel of your home is to use color and trim. Color can have a huge impact on the mood and atmosphere of a room. It can make a room feel cozy, spacious, cheerful, or calm. Trim, on the other hand, can create a sense of continuity and harmony among different spaces. It can also add character, detail, and elegance to your home.


However, choosing and applying color and trim can be tricky. You need to consider the size, shape, orientation, lighting, and function of each room. You also need to coordinate the colors and trim styles throughout your home to create a cohesive and balanced look.


Here are some examples and tips on how to use color and trim effectively in your home:



  • Use a color wheel to find complementary, analogous, or monochromatic color schemes for your rooms. Complementary colors are opposite each other on the color wheel and create contrast and excitement. Analogous colors are next to each other on the color wheel and create harmony and calmness. Monochromatic colors are shades of the same color and create simplicity and sophistication.



  • Use lighter colors for smaller or darker rooms to make them feel larger and brighter. Use darker colors for larger or brighter rooms to make them feel cozier and more intimate.



  • Use warm colors (red, orange, yellow) for rooms where you want to stimulate activity, energy, or appetite. Use cool colors (blue, green, purple) for rooms where you want to promote relaxation, tranquility, or creativity.



  • Use neutral colors (white, gray, beige, brown) for rooms where you want to create a backdrop for other elements or accent colors. Neutral colors can also help balance out bright or bold colors.



  • Use trim to define the edges, corners, and transitions of your rooms. Trim can also highlight architectural features such as windows, doors, fireplaces, or built-ins.



  • Use trim to create visual interest and contrast in your rooms. For example, you can use white trim against a dark wall color or dark trim against a light wall color.



  • Use trim to unify your interior design by using the same or similar style and color throughout your home. For example, you can use crown molding, baseboards, door casings, and window casings in the same style and color in all your rooms.



How to find space for an "away room" and design a laundry room that works




Another way to improve your home is to find space for an "away room" and design a laundry room that works. An "away room" is a space where you can retreat from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. It can be a place where you can read, meditate, nap, or pursue a hobby. A laundry room, on the other hand, is a space where you can wash, dry, fold, iron, and store your clothes. It can also be a place where you can sort, recycle, or dispose of your household waste.


However, finding space for an "away room" and designing a laundry room that works can be challenging. You need to consider the location, size, layout, function, and style of each space. You also need to make sure that each space is comfortable, convenient, and attractive.


Here are some examples and tips on how to find space for an "away room" and design a laundry room that works:



  • Find space for an "away room" by converting an unused or underused space in your home. For example, you can turn an attic, a basement, a closet, a corner, or a niche into an "away room". You can also add an "away room" by building a small addition, a bump-out, or a dormer.



  • Design an "away room" that suits your personality, needs, and preferences. For example, you can create a cozy reading nook with a comfortable chair, a lamp, and a bookshelf; a serene meditation space with a cushion, a candle, and some plants; or a creative craft room with a table, a chair, and some storage bins.



  • Make your "away room" inviting and relaxing by using soft colors, textures, and lighting. You can also add some personal touches such as photos, artwork, or memorabilia.



you can place your laundry room near your bedroom, bathroom, or closet for easy access to your clothes; or near your kitchen, mudroom, or garage for easy access to your waste bins.


  • Design a laundry room that works by optimizing the space and layout for your laundry tasks. For example, you can use a stackable washer and dryer to save floor space; or a front-loading washer and dryer to create a countertop for folding clothes.



  • Design a laundry room that works by providing adequate storage and organization for your laundry supplies and accessories. For example, you can use cabinets, shelves, bins, baskets, and hooks to store your detergent, bleach, fabric softener, dryer sheets, hangers, ironing board, and iron.



  • Design a laundry room that works by making it comfortable and attractive with the right lighting, ventilation, and finishes. For example, you can use natural or artificial lighting to brighten up your space and make it easier to see stains and colors; a window or a fan to provide fresh air and prevent mold and mildew; and durable and easy-to-clean materials such as tile, laminate, or vinyl for your flooring, walls, and countertops.



How to determine how much space you really need and where to put the garage




One of the most important decisions you need to make when designing your home is how much space you really need and where to put the garage. These decisions will affect not only the size and cost of your home, but also its functionality and appearance.


However, determining how much space you really need and where to put the garage can be difficult. You need to consider your current and future lifestyle, needs, preferences, budget, and site conditions. You also need to avoid common mistakes such as overbuilding, underbuilding, or placing the garage in an inconvenient or unsightly location.


Here are some examples and tips on how to determine how much space you really need and where to put the garage:



  • Determine how much space you really need by assessing your lifestyle and needs before deciding on the size and layout of your home. For example, you can ask yourself questions such as: How many people live in your home now and in the future? How many bedrooms and bathrooms do you need? How often do you entertain guests? How do you spend your time at home? What are your hobbies and interests?



  • Determine how much space you really need by avoiding wasting space and money on rooms you don't use or need. For example, you can eliminate or reduce the size of rooms such as formal living rooms, dining rooms, or guest rooms that are rarely used. You can also combine or multipurpose rooms such as a home office that doubles as a guest room or a mudroom that doubles as a laundry room.



  • Determine how much space you really need by using design strategies that make your home feel larger and more spacious without adding square footage. For example, you can use open floor plans, high ceilings, large windows, skylights, sliding doors, built-ins, mirrors, light colors, and minimal clutter to create a sense of openness and flow in your home.



  • Integrate the garage into your home design without compromising curb appeal or functionality by locating it near the source or destination of your car trips. For example, you can place your garage near your kitchen, mudroom, or pantry for easy access to groceries and other items; or near your home office, workshop, or hobby room for easy access to tools and equipment.



  • Integrate the garage into your home design without compromising curb appeal or functionality by choosing the right size, style, orientation, and placement of your garage. For example, you can choose a garage that matches or complements the architecture and color of your home; orient it perpendicular or parallel to the street depending on the shape and slope of your lot; place it behind, beside, or under your home depending on the available space and visibility.



How to design a kitchen that suits your cooking style and a bathroom that feels like a spa




Another way to improve your home is to design a kitchen that suits your cooking style and a bathroom that feels like a spa. A kitchen is more than just a place to prepare and cook food; it is also a place to socialize, entertain, and express your creativity. A bathroom is more than just a place to wash and groom; it is also a place to relax, rejuvenate, and pamper yourself.


However, designing a kitchen that suits your cooking style and a bathroom that feels like a spa can be challenging. You need to consider the function, layout, storage, appliances, lighting, and finishes of each space. You also need to make sure that each space reflects your personality, preferences, and needs.


Here are some examples and tips on how to design a kitchen that suits your cooking style and a bathroom that feels like a spa:



  • Design a kitchen that suits your cooking style by identifying your cooking style and preferences before designing your kitchen. For example, you can ask yourself questions such as: Are you a casual or a serious cook? Do you cook alone or with others? Do you cook from scratch or use prepared ingredients? Do you cook for yourself or for a large family?



  • Design a kitchen that suits your cooking style by optimizing your kitchen layout, storage, appliances, lighting, and finishes for your cooking style. For example, you can use the work triangle principle to arrange your sink, stove, and refrigerator in an efficient and ergonomic way; use cabinets, drawers, shelves, racks, and hooks to store your pots, pans, utensils, spices, and other items; use appliances that match your cooking needs and preferences such as a gas or electric range, a convection or microwave oven, a dishwasher or a sink; use lighting that provides adequate illumination and ambiance for your cooking tasks such as recessed lights, pendant lights, under-cabinet lights, or dimmers; use finishes that are durable, easy-to-clean, and attractive for your countertops, backsplash, flooring, and walls such as granite, tile, wood, or paint.



  • Design a bathroom that feels like a spa by creating a bathroom that feels like a spa with the right fixtures, materials, lighting, and accessories. For example, you can use fixtures that provide comfort, convenience, and luxury such as a soaking tub, a rain shower, a double vanity, or a heated towel rack; use materials that are natural, textured, and soothing such as stone, marble, wood, or bamboo; use lighting that provides adequate illumination and mood for your bathroom activities such as recessed lights, sconces, candles, or dimmers; use accessories that add personality, style, and relaxation such as plants, artwork, rugs, or aromatherapy.



How to create a home office that boosts your productivity and a family room that fosters connection




One more way to improve your home is to create a home office that boosts your productivity and a family room that fosters connection. A home office is a space where you can work from home efficiently and comfortably. A family room is a space where you can spend quality time with your family and friends.


However, creating a home office that boosts your productivity and a family room that fosters connection can be difficult. You need to consider the location, size, layout, function, and style of each space. You also need to balance privacy and openness, create zones, and add personality in each space.


Here are some examples and tips on how to create a home office that boosts your productivity and a family room that fosters connection:



  • Create a home office that boosts your productivity by setting up a home office that meets your work needs and preferences. For example, you can ask yourself questions such as: What kind of work do you do? How often do you work from home? What equipment and supplies do you need? How much space do you need?



  • Create a home office that boosts your productivity by minimizing distractions, organizing your space, and enhancing your comfort in your home office. For example, you can use a door or a screen to separate your home office from the rest of the house; use cabinets, shelves, bins, and folders to store your files, documents, and other items; use an ergonomic chair, desk, keyboard, and mouse to support your posture and prevent injuries.



  • Create a family room that fosters connection by designing a family room that encourages interaction, relaxation, and entertainment. For example, you can use comfortable seating such as sofas, chairs, ottomans, or bean bags to accommodate different activities and preferences; use a coffee table or an ottoman to serve as a center point for conversation and games; use an entertainment center or a wall-mounted TV to provide options for watching movies or playing video games.



  • Create a family room that fosters connection by balancing privacy and openness, creating zones, and adding personality in your family room. For example, blinds to control the amount of light and noise that enters your family room; use rugs, pillows, or curtains to create cozy and comfortable zones for reading, playing, or napping; use artwork, photos, or memorabilia to add personality and character to your family room.



Conclusion




In conclusion, designing a home that suits your lifestyle, needs, and preferences can be a rewarding and enjoyable process. By applying the "Not So Big" design principles to your home improvement projects, you can create a home that is more comfortable, functional, and beautiful without spending a fortune or adding unnecessary square footage.


If you want to learn more about how to improve your home with the "Not So Big" design approach, you can get the book More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home by Sarah Susanka. This book is a collection of articles by the best-selling author and visionary residential architect who sparked a movement toward better, not bigger homes. In this book, Susanka shares her insights on how to apply her philosophy of "Not So Big" design to various aspects of your home improvement projects.


You can also visit the author's website at www.notsobig.com for more information, resources, and inspiration. There you can find more books, articles, videos, podcasts, and workshops by Sarah Susanka and other "Not So Big" experts. You can also join the "Not So Big" community and share your ideas and experiences with other like-minded homeowners.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the book More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home and the "Not So Big" design philosophy:



What is the main idea of the "Not So Big" design philosophy?


  • The main idea of the "Not So Big" design philosophy is that quality is more important than quantity when it comes to designing a home. Instead of focusing on how big or how much a home is, the "Not So Big" design philosophy focuses on how well or how much a home fits your lifestyle, needs, and preferences.



Who can benefit from the "Not So Big" design philosophy?


  • Anyone who wants to improve their home can benefit from the "Not So Big" design philosophy. Whether you are planning to remodel, add on, or build from scratch, the "Not So Big" design philosophy can help you create a home that is more comfortable, functional, and beautiful without spending a fortune or adding unnecessary square footage.



What are some examples of the "Not So Big" design principles?


  • Some examples of the "Not So Big" design principles are: using color and trim to unify an interior; finding space for an "away room" and designing a laundry room that works; determining how much space you really need and where to put the garage; designing a kitchen that suits your cooking style and a bathroom that feels like a spa; creating a home office that boosts your productivity and a family room that fosters connection.



Where can I get the book More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home by Sarah Susanka?


  • You can get the book More Not So Big Solutions for Your Home by Sarah Susanka from various online and offline retailers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or your local bookstore. You can also borrow it from your local library or download it as an e-book or an audiobook.



Where can I find more information about Sarah Susanka and the "Not So Big" design philosophy?


  • You can find more information about Sarah Susanka and the "Not So Big" design philosophy on her website at www.notsobig.com. There you can find more books, articles, videos, podcasts, and workshops by Sarah Susanka and other "Not So Big" experts. You can also join the "Not So Big" community and share your ideas and experiences with other like-minded homeowners.



71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page